A recipe inspired by the abundance of spring, created by our volunteer Megan Leaf

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You know it’s spring when there’s an abundance of leeks at the farmers’ market! Until last year, I had no idea how to cook a leek or what they even tasted like. They seemed a little intimidating – like giant overgrown scallions. Was I supposed to use them as garnish?  

 But then I picked some up at the farmers market – 3 GIANT leeks for $2! – and decided to try them out in a potato leek soup. And guess what – they were amazing! Like extra buttery onions. But smoother.

Anyways, since last year I’ve mostly used them in pastas. But they can also go into a quiche for Mother’s Day, into stir fry, into a lovely baked chicken dinner, into puff pastry shells for fancy appetizers. 

This recipe is an example of what I crave when spring rolls around – pasta with very little sauce, but lots of veggies, little bits of salty meat, and a lemony zing. You can easily substitute or add to this dish. I could eat it with a big handful of spinach, cooked down into the pasta at the last minute. Add artichoke hearts, or peas, or asparagus. Substitute fresh baked salmon for the pancetta. Go crazy and get creative with all the green produce in season right now!

Rigatoni with Leeks, Mushrooms & Pancetta

1 16 oz. package rigatoni
salt
¾ cup leftover pasta water
½ cup white wine
1/3 cup parmesan reggiano + extra for topping
3 tbsp butter, divided
4 oz. pancetta or bacon
2 large leeks, chopped
2 large portabella mushrooms
Fresh parsley, chopped
1 lemon, zested and juiced
3 tbsp milk
Salt and pepper to taste

Bring a pot of salted water to boil. Cook the rigatoni according to the instructions on the box, but take out 1-2 minutes early, before they reach the al dente stage. They should still be a little chewy with a snap. Drain the pasta, reserving ¾ cup of the water and set aside in a bowl.

While pasta is cooking, slice the leeks in half, and then into strips (see photo).

Dice the pancetta into tiny cubes. Cut the portabella mushrooms into ½ inch cubes.

Heat a medium saucepan over medium heat, with 1 tbsp of the butter. Add the pancetta to the pan and cook in the butter, about 5 minutes, to become just lightly brown. Using a slotted spoon, transfer pancetta to a plate, leaving the melted fat and oil in the pan.

Add the chopped leeks and mushrooms to the pan (still over medium heat). Cook until the mushrooms are soft and small.  The leeks and mushrooms should cook down to about half. Transfer cooked leeks and mushrooms to a bowl.

In the saucepan, still over medium heat, melt the additional 2 tablespoons of butter. Add lemon zest and juice, pasta water, and white wine. Turn up the heat to medium/high and allow to come to a boil. Stir in the 1/3 cup of parmesan cheese until no longer lumpy. Add the not-quite-al dente pasta to the sauce and stir well until noodles are totally coated and sauce begins to cook down. When there is only about 3-4 tbsp of sauce left in the pan, take the pan off the heat. Stir in the milk until completely incorporated. Add the leeks, mushrooms, and pancetta to the pasta and mix well. Add salt and pepper as desired.

Enjoy topped with fresh parsley and more parmesan!

 

Photos & Recipe by: Megan Leaf, The Bay Leaf Kitchen

Posted
AuthorKitchen Table Advisors
CategoriesRecipes

This month, in addition to the sunny days, blossoming trees and fresh spring greens, there's one more seasonal milestone to celebrate -- Sabor de Abril. For the entire month of April, Kitchen Table Advisors has paired four farms from our newest cohort with four equally amazing sustainably-focused, Mexican-oriented restaurants. Each week these pioneer chefs will be featuring one of our clients in their specialty tacos. All of our participating restaurants will donate a portion of proceeds from this event to support our efforts to fuel the economic viability of these talented and hard-working farmers and ranchers. Tacos are on the menu this month!

Sabor de Abril is the second iteration of this delicious annual fundraiser. Last year, we collaborated with our farmers and chefs to feature Italian pizza via Sapore di Marzo. After Sapore, we made the decision to focus on a new type of cuisine in order to highlight the versatility and diversity of both the clients we work with and our restaurant partners. From there, we spent a lot of time thinking about what foods represent the demographics of the clients we serve, the type of food that we personally love to eat and the types of stories that we are focused on telling this year. Tacos embodied all of those objectives. By participating in Sabor, people can get to know the farms that are stewarding the land in ways that keep our food system healthy, in addition to the restaurants that are supporting these farms by purchasing their products and creating dishes that form the centerpieces of our dining experiences. 

Each week of April presents a different farmer-chef collaboration on tacos. Simply order the specialty taco on the menu when you visit any of our restaurant partners during their featured week. Taco ingredients have been purchased direct from our farmers. 

April 5-9: Los Cilantros paired with Sol Seeker Farm

April 10-16: El Molino Central paired with Big Mesa Farm

April 17-23: Tacos Cala paired with Cruz-Martinez Farm

April 24-30: Mestiza Taqueria paired with La Granjita Organics

With April already underway, if you haven't gotten to Los Cilantros yet this week, you're late! 

 

On February 28, 2017, 300+ people gathered at UC Davis for the annual CalCAN (California Climate and Agriculture Network) conference. Farmers and ranchers, government and non-profit agencies, policy advocates and funders came together to learn, share best practices, and problem solve around agriculture and climate change.

I had never been to the CalCAN Summit before, but left feeling blown away by the quality of people and conversation. I clearly sensed the deep intersection of our work supporting the economic viability of sustainable small farms and ranches with CalCAN’s coalition and policy work supporting ecological land stewardship and climate resilience on farms.  Several of the farms we support at Kitchen Table Advisors had a presence at the conference: Javier Zamora of JSM Organics was on a farmer panel in the opening plenary; Emma Torbert of Cloverleaf Farm participated in a workshop; and Alexis and Gilles Robertson of Skyelark Ranch hosted a farm tour.

It was great to be in dialogue with seasoned farmers like Judith Redmond of Full Belly Farm and Albert Straus of Straus Family Creamery; non-profit partners like POST, California FarmLink, Point Blue, and the Carbon Cycle Institute; thoughtful policy advocates like Renata Brillinger at CalCAN and Dave Runsten at CAFF; and key supporters like Sallie Calhoun of Paicines Ranch, Michael Roberts and Joanna Lehrman at 11th Hour Project, Susan Clark at Gaia Fund, and Nancy Schaub of New Priorities Foundation.

The day after the CalCAN Summit, 70+ people spent the day visiting three farms in the Capay Valley to walk the land, touch and feel the soil, and hear from farmers on the ground about healthy soils, agriculture and climate change, and how they understand the connection between operating an economically successful farm while stewarding the land.

The first stop was at Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation Farm & Ranch, owned and operated by the Wintun Nation tribe, to hear from ranch manager Adam Cline about his efforts to raise cattle while improving soil and ecosystem health. Co-leading the tour was Corey Shake, a partner biologist with Point Blue who is part of a statewide rangeland monitoring network providing advice and conducting wildlife and plant species monitoring to learn about the impacts of grazing strategies on soil health.

The group moved on to Full Belly Farm to enjoy a delicious organic lunch prepared on farm with their fresh organic ingredients. Co-owners Judith Redmond and Paul Muller shared their experiments and experiences with minimizing soil disturbance, using various cover crop mixes, and rotating livestock to enhance soil organic matter and carbon sequestration.

The last stop on the farm tour was with Kitchen Table Advisors client Skyelark Ranch, a 40-acre pastured livestock ranch operated by Alexis and Gillies Robertson who receive business advising from our Farm Business Advisor based in Yolo County, Thomas Nelson. Alexis and Gilles are a young couple who have been farming since 2010. They sell their pastured lamb and pork through the Davis and Oakland Jack London Square farmers’ markets, and their pastured eggs to institutions like Airbnb through food hubs like the Capay Valley Farm Shop.

We walked under the canopy of an old almond orchard where Alexis and Gillies rotate pigs and chickens next to fields where they grow hay and graze their sheep. The focus of the conversation was, of course, around how they manage the animals and their land, and how the land stewardship practices of farms like theirs are helping fight climate change.

After we walked under blue skies to the top of the hill that overlooks their farm, Alexis and Gillies reminded us that this conversation about their efforts to steward the land, sequester carbon, and battle climate change has to be considered in the context of the long-term viability of their farm business and their ability to make enough to support their family.  They have a one-year-old daughter, Isla. The family has been working hard and fighting an uphill battle to build Skyelark Ranch to be a farm business that raises livestock in a humane way that is in balance with the land and their community, and provides a living for their young family.

It’s more than clear to Alexis and Gillies that they need to have a farm that is economically viable in order to be sustainable. They need to be able to cover business expenses and investments in long-term farm infrastructure; cover their family’s living expenses; and hopefully have the chance to eventually save a little money. Because if they can’t do that, then despite their best intentions, they will not be able to continue stewarding the land in a way that is in line with their values, incorporating practices that sequester carbon, and building healthy soils.

As the sun was getting low in the sky, we closed our conversation surrounded by sheep in one of their pastures. We talked about how long-term farm viability is a necessary piece of the puzzle to nurturing ecological farm land stewardship, and how farmers like Alexis and Gillies need to focus on running their farm as a business AND build a network of support. It became apparent that all of us gathered together at the CalCAN Summit, standing in a circle around Alexis and Gillies in their pasture, were part of that network: seasoned farmers who provide advice and support; groups like the Capay Valley Farm Shop and Fibershed that market, aggregate, and distribute their product; non-profits like Kitchen Table Advisors and California FarmLink that provide business advising and financing; and organizations like CalCAN that advocate for policy solutions that create an environment in which farms like Skyelark Ranch can thrive. And we each rambled off into the lazy sun of the afternoon to go back to where we came from to play our part in this ecosystem.

Photos courtesy of CalCAN.

Winter Citrus Biónico

Breakfast, snack or dessert, this beautiful and simple dish is sure to delight your tastebuds. Our friends at Nourish | Resist, a newly-formed group of people of color working in the food industry who are using food as a tool for resistance, are the masterminds behind this creation, which we know will be gracing your kitchen table all year long! 

Winter Citrus Biónico
 

 Makes 4 servings
 
4 cups segmented citrus, such as Cara Cara and blood oranges
5 ounces Crema Mexicana
5 ounces plain yogurt
1 tsp vanilla
2 Tbsp condensed milk or honey (or a mixture of both)
1/2 cup granola
 
Optional Toppings:
Toasted shredded Coconut
Chopped nuts
Dried fruit
 
Mix Crema and yogurt together, and flavor with vanilla and condense milk or honey. Portion out cut fruit and top with cream-yogurt mixture, granola and other toppings.
 
This dish is all about your taste and texture preferences. Feel free to use more or less of the sweeteners, and to mix it up when it comes to toppings and fruit. Use whatever you have, or whatever wonderful fruits are in season.

Posted
AuthorKitchen Table Advisors
CategoriesRecipes
Blue House Farm crew

Blue House Farm crew

In 2016, Bertha Magaña of Magaña Farm in Watsonville lost roughly 14,400 pounds of strawberries. The loss wasn’t due to pests or weather woes. It was due to a lack of manpower--a challenge many Kitchen Table Advisors clients and farmers across the nation are facing.

“There are not enough laborers is basically what it comes down to,” says David Mancera, a business advisor with Kitchen Table Advisors. “Our farmers are struggling.”

For Magaña, no labor to help harvest one acre of strawberries for three consecutive months meant missing out on some $16,000 in profit. Magaña is not alone. The lack of labor has forced many farmers across the country to cut back production or even sell portions of their land.

On the campaign trail, President Donald Trump drew a hard line on immigration, claiming in a speech on August 31st that, “…most illegal immigrants are lower-skilled workers with less education who compete directly against vulnerable American workers, and these illegal workers draw much more out of the system than they will ever pay in.”

The reality is that many of the roles undocumented immigrants fill would otherwise go unfilled. As reported by the Wall Street Journal, small business owners say that U.S.-born workers don’t want the jobs these immigrants are taking on. There is a serious labor shortage across the nation, and it’s hitting agriculture especially hard. The American Farm Bureau Federation estimates that 70% of all field workers are undocumented.

Mancera explains that right now it’s a laborer’s market. “If you walk around the Salinas Valley, you’ll see signs all over the place advertising for labor.”

Blue House Farm

Blue House Farm

What’s behind the shortage? Mancera notes a number of factors, including stricter immigration laws, an increasingly costly — and dangerous — border crossing, new economic drivers to stay in Mexico, and increasing work options in industries with easier, safer conditions like hospitality and landscaping.  

The result of this shortage is unharvested crops and even forfeited land. According to a report by the Partnership for a New American Economy, a nonpartisan group that aims to influence immigration reform, the labor decline has reduced produce and tree nut production by $3.1 billion per year. The group reports that in California, the number of full-time equivalent field and crop workers declined by about 85,000 people between 2002 and 2014.

The desperate need for more hands on deck puts farm owners in a relatively powerless position. “The farm workers are jumping from place to place,” says Mancera. “They know they have the upper hand, so if there’s something they don’t like, they just leave.”

With a commitment to sustainability, many of the Kitchen Table Advisors farmers find themselves in a particularly difficult position owing to the fact that their farm operations are labor-intensive. Non-mechanized harvests and avoidance of pesticides mean that small farmers are more reliant on individuals to support their production. Rising wages across industries and a shrinking pool of farm workers makes it increasingly challenging for small farm owners to reach economic viability.

Mancera notes that raising wages isn’t a viable option for most farmers due to economic constraints. At the same time, for many laborers, higher wages aren’t the ultimate goal as they don’t want to lose benefits like childcare services.

What they are interested in is year-round work. Some farmers are joining forces to offer long-term work via labor shares. For the workers, it means having work for several harvests lined up instead of just one. Mancera praises the farmers’ creativity, but notes the complications with this approach: “It gets tricky because they also have to try and plan their production and planting cycles around the shared labor.”

Another common approach Mancera sees is farmers looking to relatives and the community. Social gatherings, be it Sunday church or soccer, become a way to find help. Because the people in these networks of friends, family, and neighbors typically have day jobs, they’ll go to the farm in the evening to help harvest. Payment varies from cash to vegetables or even a big group dinner.  

Blue House Farm

Blue House Farm

Looking ahead, Mancera sees the financial advising that Kitchen Table Advisors offers as being more vital than ever. By providing his clients with a deeper understanding of their finances, Mancera hopes to help them make more informed, empowered business decisions. He is also eager to support them in utilizing the federal H2-A visa program which provides temporary visas for foreigners who’ve secured seasonal agriculture work.

As for what we can do to help, Mancera feels that the answer doesn’t lie so much in talking to Congress as it does in talking amongst ourselves: “By talking about [agriculture], maybe we can become more appreciative of those who produce and harvest the food that we eat and that nourishes our body.”

He’s hopeful that if the dialogue around food and its growers was ongoing and alive at every dinner table, things would start to shift. He muses that perhaps curious teens — aware that their food comes from the Salinas Valley, not just the grocery store — would even consider harvesting produce as a summer job.  

One thing is for certain: We owe it to our farmers to talk more about the labor shortage, not the misplaced fear of Mexicans stealing American jobs. “I don’t know why we’re not talking about it more,” says Mancera. “I don’t know why it’s not the conversation.”

Photos courtesy of Blue House Farm.

In 2013, we began advising 10 sustainable small farms. In 2016, these original 10 farms graduated into our alumni program, while we simultaneously began a three-year journey with 15 new farms and ranches. And now at the end of this year, we are welcoming an incoming group of 14 new clients, tripling the number of small farms and ranches served since our inception. By assessing our program impact from the pilot project, we have been able to refine our program model and expand our services to a greater number of farms and ranches in the region. With greater reach, we are introducing new metrics to assess our clients' impact on soil health, food access, and social justice. Not to mention, we're also planting our stake in the ground to represent our support for diversity in the leadership of our food system, specifically among Latinos, women, and LGBTQ farmers.  

We are in a wonderful place right now--similar, yet different to the place many of our new clients are in when they join our organization.  Kitchen Table Advisors will be turning four years old this January 2017–-having just passed the starting line for our three-year pilot project--and now scaling up in Phase 2 of our growth. This is an exciting time, with the challenge of ramping up while staying thoughtful and true to our core values and priorities.  We are also setting the foundation for a humming organization--through planning for our current and future clients and improving systems for our team to have better efficiency without losing the personalized relationships that have proven to be the secret sauce of our work. Our team is changing and growing, which only means one thing: we are creating a better organization--collaborating on the best of our collective ideas, inspirations, and perspectives. 

During our New Client Gathering in November, we had the pleasure of bringing (almost) all of our new clients together to get acquainted, and ask questions, and harness the energy of the group. This cohort was game from the start, jumping in immediately and sharing challenges that they are facing right now and their overall visions for their farms. Farmers spoke about wanting to create a meaningful workplace for their employees--a place where their employees are happy to go everyday and find fulfillment in their contribution. We heard themes surrounding access to land, markets, and capital--these are many of the same challenges that young farmers face. In addition, there are the ever present challenges that are completely out of a farmer's control: weather, water, time, technology.

Our new cohort of clients are asking themselves big questions as well as finding themselves at inflection points that we are excited to support.  One set of new clients is a budding partnership where two farm owners are bringing on two new partners. They are thrilled for the expansion of their farm family, and are committed to supporting everyone and clarifying a common vision. Another client is currently determining the best legal structure for his business entity as well as preparing his business to hire employees. For all of our clients, deciding the right path forward for their enterprise comes at a time when the landscape of how business is done in our country is changing.  With already extreme labor shortages in the farm sector, the outlook for the future is unknown. Additionally, proposed changes to Agricultural Labor Laws are coming down the pipeline and the cost of land in the Bay Area continues to rise steadily.

One piece of what we do through our advising program is to help our farmers understand and manage risk. Some of that comes with planning for known risks, and some is creating resilience in their surroundings (labor pool, vendor relationships, lenders) that will sustain them through the unanticipated storms. Sometimes, simply creating the space and practicing looking up from the daily work toward what's ahead is enough to help our clients plan for success.

In the midst of these challenges, our new clients are also extremely well-poised for this success. There is a network of support available to them--food hubs like like Coke Farm, FEED Sonoma, Capay Valley Farm Shop, and Veritable Vegetable--that champion their farm treasures and stories. There is also a growing number of corporate food service companies offering healthy local farm to table food. From amazing chefs at celebrated restaurants to retailers who highlight farm sourcing to destination farmers markets, the local farming community is cherished and lauded by many folks in and around the Bay Area.

Our new and existing farmers will need all sorts of support to change the tide towards resilient and diverse farming communities, because everyone who eats is a part of the story. Continue voting with your fork! Purchase directly from your farmer: through a CSA, an animal share, from a trusted restaurant or retailer that sources from local farmers. Share with your neighbors and your kids about why local food and transparent sourcing is important to you. Support our incredible local network of organizations who work daily to create opportunities for triple bottom line farmers--ALBA, California Farmlink, POST, and CUESA. Most importantly, get to know your farmers and be a champion of your local farm scene.  

Without further ado, here is our wonderful new cohort of clients! And don't forget to check out our 2016 cohort and alumni, as well! 

Photos courtesy of Jeff Spirer.

 

It's around the holidays that I feel particularly blessed to live in California, and so close to the amazing year-round farmers market in Palo Alto. There is so much inspiration for what to make, so many beautiful produce options from Early Girl tomatoes in the summer, to acorn and kabocha squashes in the fall, to root vegetables in the heart of winter.

If you're like me, you're pretty tired of the Thanksgiving side of green beans in fatty cream sauce -- only slightly redeemed by crunchy chip-like onions on top. Do something different this season with the abundance of beautiful rainbow carrots. I wanted an alternative vegetable side dish that uses one of my favorite flavor combinations: sweet/salty/spicy. This is definitely a unique dish to bring with you to Friendsgiving celebrations, but can also serve to expand your family's horizons when eaten along with a traditional Thanksgiving spread.

  • 2 tbsp white miso paste
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil
  • 2 bunches of rainbow carrots (about 10-15 total)
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • 1 1/2 tbsp olive oil
  • Pepper to taste
  • Dry-roasted pepitas to sprinkle on top

Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Wash and peel the carrots. Chop them into 1 inch thick chunks (optional). Toss in 1/2 tbsp of the olive oil and sprinkle with pepper and chili powder as desired.

In a cast iron skillet, heat 1 tbsp of the olive oil over medium heat until rippling. Add the carrots to the oil and allow to cook until darkened on the outside, and just soft enough to pierce through with a fork. They should still be rather firm.

In a small, separate bowl, stir miso paste, sesame oil and maple syrup until mostly smooth. When the carrots have softened slightly and browned, turn off the heat, pour the syrup mixture over them and toss. 

Add the carrots to the preheated oven and cook for about 20 more minutes, turning them over halfway and checking their texture. The syrup will become darker and sticky, and the carrots should be browned on the outside, but softer and easier to pierce through all the way.

Take them out of the oven and sprinkle pepitas over them. Serve warm.

If you're wondering where to collect your ingredients for this week's holiday meal, consider shopping at the Ferry Building's special Thanksgiving Farmers Market this Wednesday, where you can source produce, meats, and other delectable bites directly from your farmers, ranchers, and producers, including our client, Ground Stew Farms. 

The original recipe can be found on Megan's blog, The Bay Leaf Kitchen. Photos courtesy of Megan Leaf. 

An hour from Silicon Valley, the small town of Hollister feels a world away. Marsha and Modesto, farmers and co-owners of Oya Organics, live and work in Hollister, where they raise their young family and build their small business. Oya Organics is an 18-acre organic vegetable farm on Las Viboras Road that produces healthy food and creates employment opportunities in a town that desperately needs them. After three years of investing blood, sweat, and tears into her business, Marsha has a lot to be proud of.

 

Cristoforo emigrated from Oaxaca, Mexico to the U.S., where he was given the opportunity to work alongside his nephew Modesto, the co-owner of Oya Organics. He proudly displays a vine of fava beans that are ripe for harvest.

Cristoforo emigrated from Oaxaca, Mexico to the U.S., where he was given the opportunity to work alongside his nephew Modesto, the co-owner of Oya Organics. He proudly displays a vine of fava beans that are ripe for harvest.

Cristoforo settles into his work during an early spring morning in Hollister, California. Located about an hour south of the world’s technology mecca, Silicon Valley, Hollister is a sleepy, slow-moving town whose local economy and labor force is powered primarily by agriculture.

Cristoforo settles into his work during an early spring morning in Hollister, California. Located about an hour south of the world’s technology mecca, Silicon Valley, Hollister is a sleepy, slow-moving town whose local economy and labor force is powered primarily by agriculture.

Saori, the three-year-old daughter of Oya owners Marsha and Modesto, races up the stairs of her two-story house. Although Hollister is considered to be a part of San Francisco’s greater Bay Area, the economic context is far different from how most perceive the region. For example, the median home value in Hollister is $471,700, compared to $712,000 in the Bay Area. 

Saori, the three-year-old daughter of Oya owners Marsha and Modesto, races up the stairs of her two-story house. Although Hollister is considered to be a part of San Francisco’s greater Bay Area, the economic context is far different from how most perceive the region. For example, the median home value in Hollister is $471,700, compared to $712,000 in the Bay Area. 

Marsha, Saori’s mother, takes a break from her administrative duties and house work to chase her daughter around the house. The mother-daughter dynamic they share is beautifully unique. Marsha’s stoic exterior is counterbalanced by Saori’s outspokenness and relentless pace. 

Marsha, Saori’s mother, takes a break from her administrative duties and house work to chase her daughter around the house. The mother-daughter dynamic they share is beautifully unique. Marsha’s stoic exterior is counterbalanced by Saori’s outspokenness and relentless pace. 

Marsha, the owner of Oya Organics, takes an order over the phone right after preparing breakfast for her daughter, Saori. With a small business to run, a messy home, and a young child to care for, you'd assume Marsha would be in a constant struggle to maintain sanity. Yet her calm nature keeps her feet planted and her head clear. 

Marsha, the owner of Oya Organics, takes an order over the phone right after preparing breakfast for her daughter, Saori. With a small business to run, a messy home, and a young child to care for, you'd assume Marsha would be in a constant struggle to maintain sanity. Yet her calm nature keeps her feet planted and her head clear. 

After a quick stop at the irrigation store, Marsha picks up lunch for her and her fellow Oya farmers, while Saori gazes longingly into the store’s baked goods case. 

After a quick stop at the irrigation store, Marsha picks up lunch for her and her fellow Oya farmers, while Saori gazes longingly into the store’s baked goods case. 

Back at the farm for lunch, Saori makes a mad dash towards her uncle Cristoforo's room which doubles as a break room for the farmers. His room is host to empty beer cans, farming tools, a mattress and a stuffed tiger that Saori used as her very own horse.

Back at the farm for lunch, Saori makes a mad dash towards her uncle Cristoforo's room which doubles as a break room for the farmers. His room is host to empty beer cans, farming tools, a mattress and a stuffed tiger that Saori used as her very own horse.

The farm’s de facto elder and primary tractor operator Alfredo, smiles brightly as he prepares for hours of driving in the field. 

The farm’s de facto elder and primary tractor operator Alfredo, smiles brightly as he prepares for hours of driving in the field. 

Marsha waters her plants in the greenhouse as the afternoon begins to settle over the farm.

Marsha waters her plants in the greenhouse as the afternoon begins to settle over the farm.

Saori watches her mother harvest crops out of the window of a pickup truck. It’s evident that she keenly admires her mother's strength. 

Saori watches her mother harvest crops out of the window of a pickup truck. It’s evident that she keenly admires her mother's strength. 

After over an hour of harvesting Oya’s fava bean field, Marsha loads up her truck and drives it back to the staging area where the produce is cleaned and boxed again.  

After over an hour of harvesting Oya’s fava bean field, Marsha loads up her truck and drives it back to the staging area where the produce is cleaned and boxed again.  

Freshly picked and washed radishes glisten in the soft late-afternoon light. Next, they will be boxed and loaded in Oya’s truck to head to their final destination -- the Berkeley Farmer’s Market.     

Freshly picked and washed radishes glisten in the soft late-afternoon light. Next, they will be boxed and loaded in Oya’s truck to head to their final destination -- the Berkeley Farmer’s Market.